Rwandas Prime Minister inaugurates new Science and Technology Centre

Rwandas Prime Minister Anastase Murekezi today inaugurated a new Science and Technology Centre at the Adventist University of Central Africa (AUCA).

Located in Gishushu, the Centre has the capacity to accommodate up to 6,000 students.

Speaking at the inauguration, Prime Minister Murekezi said:

We are counting on skilled and competitive graduates, with a mindset of innovation and entrepreneurship, to seize new opportunities, in our rapidly growing economy.

It is fitting that this new campus will focus on science and technology. The building is not only a distinctive architectural contribution to Kigali’s skyline, but inside it also integrates the modern technologies, that young Rwandans must master to compete in the global knowledge economy.

AUCA was founded in 1978 but opened in 1984, and it remains one of the key higher learning institutions in the country.

Sub-Saharan Africa Regional Ministerial Conference on Education Opens in Kigali

Rwanda hosts the Sub-Saharan Africa Regional Ministerial Conference on Education Post-2015. The three-day conference attended by 47 ministers and delegations from across the Sub-Saharan Africa who have come together to set out an African vision for the post-2015 education agenda.

This regional ministerial conference is organised by the Government of Rwanda in collaboration with the United Nations Organization for Education, Science and Culture (UNESCO).

The conference is also attended by stakeholders from regional economic communities, international organisations, civil society representatives, UN agencies and academics from countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

In his opening remarks, Rwanda’s Minister of Education Prof. Silas Lwakabamba stated that, in the last decade, the Sub-Saharan part of the continent has made progress in increasing equitable access to basic education which now stands at 96.6 percent at primary level.

Notwithstanding such successes however, we do recognize that improvements in the quality of education needs special attention, especially during the early years of schooling.

Speaking at the conference, UNESCO’s Assistant Director General for Education Mr. Qian Tang pointed out that the conference is held in preparation of this year’s World Education Forum, and that its outcomes will inform perspectives and recommendations for the post-2015 agenda:

This conference will promote an analysis of regional progress in education, particularly in the context of Education for All (EFA) goals. It will also contribute to the elaboration of the Framework Action to be approved at the World Education Forum.

The conference plays a crucial role in ensuring that Africa’s voice is heard and contributes to defining the education agenda.

In its National Policy on Science, Technology and Innovation, Rwanda prioritises investment in education to achieve the country’s development objectives with an aim to develop strong and efficient networks of skills and knowledge.

Rwanda promotes scientific and technological innovation as key enablers to ensure sustainable economic growth and the countrys vision is to become a knowledge-based economy by 2020

New programme at the University of Rwanda to benefit women in agribusiness

The  University of Rwanda has teamed up with the Michigan State University to start a Master of Science degree programme aimed at helping women get a strong foothold in agribusiness. The programme will enroll its first cohort of students in February 2015.

According to news releases, the graduate programme prioritises accessibility to women and midcareer professionals and will incorporate extensive experiential learning opportunities for students. The structure of the programme requires all students to partake in an internship, thus better preparing them for leadership and entrepreneurial roles in agriculture in Rwanda.

Emeritus Professor James McWha, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Rwanda, said the programme is a major development of the future of the agriculture and food industries in the country:

Agriculture is vital to the people and economy of Rwanda and many of those involved in agriculture are women. Their input to the business of agriculture is essential. It is also important that agriculture adopts a modern business strategy because it is a business and all those involved must learn the relevant skills. This program brings together all the components necessary for a major development of the future of the agriculture and food industries in Rwanda.

The programme was jointly developed with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development.

For more on this story, read:

  1. University of Rwanda and USAID Launch Master of Science in Agribusiness Degree Program
  2. MSU, University of Rwanda launch agribusiness program in Rwanda

Rwandan schools to improve child nutrition with spirulina

Under the guidance of their principals, many primaries schools in Kigali city have started to breed a blue-green algae called spirulina, widely believed to contain a miraculous array of vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

At the primary school of Nyamirambo, each pupil was assigned the care of a plastic bottle containing a sample of the culture.

Since spirulina, like any other plant, needs carbon to photosynthesis, the students have been asked to simply shake the solution every two hours, explains Francois Nyangenzi, a primary school teacher at Nyamirambo.

We are trying to formulate a new protocol for plant breeding – in bottles, under various weather conditions, with or without any other resources, Nyangezi told Xinhua.

It is expected that during the initial phase, the project will focus on three districts of Kigalicity including Gasabo, Kicukiro and Nyarugenge where the UN World Food Programme (WFP) has expanded its school feeding program in Rwanda to cover many schools especially in urban areas.

The school feeding program, which is part of a global WFP school feeding campaign launched by the agency in 2001, aims at expanding and improving education for millions of poor and suffering children around the world.

It is said that the school feeding program has increased school enrolment while the health of the school children has improved because the classrooms have been improved.

In a related development, the latest official report released by the National Institute of Statistics (NIS), four percent of Rwandan households equivalent to 82,000 homes, had poor food consumption, which represents an extremely insufficient and unbalanced diet. However, as the new plant is known in the scientific community as multicellular photosynthetic Cyanophyceae, the algae is considered acomplete protein, containing all nine essential amino acids that human beings need to survive.

Some experts say spirulina is a possible solution to the nutritional problems afflicting large portions of the human population. In several countries it is already being exploited as the food of the future. It can be cultivated in ponds or lakes, primarily in sub-tropical climates

Rwandan schools to improve child nutrition with spirulina

Under the guidance of their principals, many primaries schools in Kigali city have started to breed a blue-green algae called spirulina, widely believed to contain a miraculous array of vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

At the primary school of Nyamirambo, each pupil was assigned the care of a plastic bottle containing a sample of the culture.

Since spirulina, like any other plant, needs carbon to photosynthesis, the students have been asked to simply shake the solution every two hours, explains Francois Nyangenzi, a primary school teacher at Nyamirambo.

We are trying to formulate a new protocol for plant breeding – in bottles, under various weather conditions, with or without any other resources, Nyangezi told Xinhua.

It is expected that during the initial phase, the project will focus on three districts of Kigalicity including Gasabo, Kicukiro and Nyarugenge where the UN World Food Programme (WFP) has expanded its school feeding program in Rwanda to cover many schools especially in urban areas.

The school feeding program, which is part of a global WFP school feeding campaign launched by the agency in 2001, aims at expanding and improving education for millions of poor and suffering children around the world.

It is said that the school feeding program has increased school enrolment while the health of the school children has improved because the classrooms have been improved.

In a related development, the latest official report released by the National Institute of Statistics (NIS), four percent of Rwandan households equivalent to 82,000 homes, had poor food consumption, which represents an extremely insufficient and unbalanced diet. However, as the new plant is known in the scientific community as multicellular photosynthetic Cyanophyceae, the algae is considered acomplete protein, containing all nine essential amino acids that human beings need to survive.

Some experts say spirulina is a possible solution to the nutritional problems afflicting large portions of the human population. In several countries it is already being exploited as the food of the future. It can be cultivated in ponds or lakes, primarily in sub-tropical climates